Last week I attended the Independent Living Scotland exhibition at the SEC, Glasgow. I used to go with my parents when I was younger, but for the last couple of years I have been going to help Euan’s Guide on their stall to spread more awareness of the great work they do. There are many exhibitors that come to Glasgow from all over the UK for 2 days to showcase various different services to customers with a wide range of disabilities. Services including holiday accommodation, mobility equipment and many charities offer various services and advice. It’s a great place for everyone to be in the one place and to help thousands of visitors to live independently or help support others with a disability. I know lots of people from different organisations, so it’s a great opportunity to catch-up with them all. It was a bit quieter when I visited this year, however there was still a great buzz.

Whenever I stay in Glasgow you all know I usually stay at the Crown Plaza. I love this hotel, you can read my review here, but this time I fancied staying someplace different. A few of my fellow Euan’s Guide ambassador had recommended Clober Farm, a self-catering accessible house that is run by Spinal Injuries Scotland. The house has a living/kitchen area, a utility room, a bathroom, an en-suite shower room, 3 bedrooms, the house sleeps 6 people, a garden and patio area.

Outside of Clober Farm.
Outside of Clober Farm.
Garden at Clober Farm.
Garden at Clober Farm.

My first impressions on staying at Clober Farm are it is affordable, relaxing and great for wheelchair users as it is fully accessible. Right outside the front door there are 2 parking spaces which allow you to reverse a car right up to the door if someone needs to quickly get out of their car and into the house if it is raining. The front door is operated by a fob card that you just needed to swipe, I loved this because it allowed me to go out to the peaceful garden myself and not have to ask my helper to open the door for me. There was plenty of space within the house to allow wheelchair users to manoeuvre easily, underfloor heating meant corridors and rooms had no radiators to obstruct any path. Also, low lights in the hall and bedrooms allow visitors to easily see their pathway when it’s dark.

Linzi's bedroom for the 3 nights.
Linzi’s bedroom for the 3 nights.

There was only one bedroom that had a ceiling hoist, so that is where I slept, and luckily that was the bedroom with the en-suite, meaning it was much easier when my helper had to help me with personal tasks. The only downside I would say about this bedroom is that the ceiling hoist didn’t go through into the en-suite shower room, which would have been easier when transferring from a wet chair after having a shower. The bedroom that I slept in also had an adjustable bed identical to the one that I use at home, which goes up to save my helper straining her back when assisting me and allows me to raise the head and feet of the bed myself to lie more comfortably. All of the beds allowed visitors to raise their feet and head, which my helper Linzi really liked. There were also emergency red cords hanging freely in both bathrooms, someone beat me with the Euan’s Guide cards, but there weren’t any in the bedrooms which I feel are needed too.

My bedroom for the 3 nights with ceiling hoist and adjustable bed.
My bedroom for the 3 nights with ceiling hoist and adjustable bed.

My favourite features at Clober Farm were the smart house screens in the living room and one in my bedroom as they aloud me to open/close the blinds and switch the lights off/on independently. It’s such a little thing that people just take for granted when doing it, but when you’ve never been able to do it, it’s kind of exciting. Although the non-automatic windows had a reachable handle for wheelchair user to be able to open them manually.

Smart screen to control lights and blinds.
Smart screen to control lights and blinds.

The whole house has such a homely feel to it and they have definitely supplied everything that you could think of to make your stay better. The kitchen was small, and I wouldn’t be able to do anything for myself due to my muscle weakness, but it would be great for others. The oven toaster and fridge are at perfect heights for wheelchair users, and the worktop, that the touch screen hob was on, was adjustable for any height. Even the hoover was accessible, it was light weight and easy to move around.

Utility room with all the supplies.
Utility room with all the supplies.
Living room area.
Living room area.
Kitchen area.
Kitchen area.

Overall, I definitely recommend staying at Clober Farm if you are looking for someplace accessible to stay in Glasgow, especially if you require the use of a hoist. I did feel a little off the grid because the Wi-Fi didn’t really work, and signal was very poor, but I guess it’s good to just switch off sometimes. We didn’t really get the chance to explore around Clober Farm during this visit, but I hope to visit again soon. Maybe in the summer with some of my friends.

Relaxing with face mask and wine.
Face mask and chill.

Have you visited Clober Farm before? What are your thoughts on this accommodation?

Video coming 4pm Sunday on my YouTube channel & Euan’s Guide review coming soon.

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